Dr. Denise Adams moves to Boston Children’s Hospital

April 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Information from NOVA

Comments Off

NOVA Medical Director, Denise Adams, MD has transferred her practice to Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Adams has served as the Medical Director of NOVA since 2005 and has been an advisor to our organization since 1999. Dr. Adams can be reached at denise.adams@childrens.harvard.edu. Visit our physician directory for more information on physicians.

2016 Research and Medical Updates

April 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Information from NOVA, Treatment

Comments Off

     In the 2011 years that NOVA has worked to assist individuals diagnosed with vascular anomalies there have been incredible advances in the science of vascular tumors and malformations. These scientific discoveries often lead to targeted therapies and treatments for patients. The relief on a parent’s face, when they discover there is finally a treatment for the pain and suffering their child has endured reminds us at NOVA of the important life changing work we have been involved in for over 2 decades now. Some of the latest scientific discoveries are listed here:

  Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute have identified the PIK3CA gene in vascular malformations. This gene is a known cancer gene and its isolation in vascular malformations will lead to better treatments and therapies for patients. You can read the entire article on the MSKCI website:  https://www.mskcc.org/blog/surprising-discovery-connects-rare-vascular-disease-cancer-gene

   Another discovery this year has led us to a better understanding of Port Wine Stains and Sturge Webber Syndrome. Published in The New England Journal of Medicine, these vascular birthmarks have been linked to a single change in a single gene after conception. This genetic anomaly resulting in a PWS is known to affect about one in 300 babies, while Sturge-Weber Syndrome occurs in about one in 20,000 births. Advances in bioinformatics have helped identify when and where the molecular switch gets tipped. Jonathan Pevsner, director of bioinformatics at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, says: “It’s great because we have an immediate biochemical understanding of what’s happening, and that means we can immediately move on to the idea of what to do about it.” You can read the full article at http://zalea.com/article/15336/2016/03/31/the-science-behind-the-port-wine-birthmark?utm_source=Combined+Newsletter+List&utm_campaign=84acffbcf6-Weekly_Newsletter4_04_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5615138614-84acffbcf6-367630497

 

 

NOVA is a 501c3a organization. All donations are tax deductible. NOVA was originally founded as Hemangioma Newsline.
Contact Web Master: Admin@novanews.org     PO Box 38216 Greensboro, NC 27438-8216


This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify.